Fermenting

Fermenting – Cherry Tomato Bombs and Green Tomato Olives

I planted a few cherry tomato plants this summer for the sole purpose of making Cherry Tomato Bombs and Green Tomato Olives. I love these cut in half and added to salads, or even just a few right out of the jar, served on the side of a meal. Because they last for months in the fridge, it’s like getting a burst of summer in every bite, even during the dreary months of winter. I’d be hard pressed to choose a favorite, because they are both wonderful tasting, but entirely different.

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During my initial research, I discovered that fermented foods are super healthy, full of antioxidants, vitamins and gut-friendly bacteria, and may help with digestive issues and  inflammation. It is suggested that fermented foods will also help circulation, blood sugars and cholesterol.

I’m no medical expert, but…..if it’s true, it’s a way better option than taking certain prescribed medicines, which sometimes have worse side-effects than the ailment being treatment.

The airlocks were a wonderful investment, because it takes care of all of my fears about fermenting. I don’t have to worry about my jars of fermenting vegetables picking up wild yeast out of the air, nor developing mold. And they were cheap! I wrote about how to make the DIY airlock lids here.

It’s getting near the end of the growing season, so I’ve included directions (and printable recipe cards) for both red cherry tomatoes and green cherry tomatoes. The green ones really do taste like olives. They can be used any way that you would normally serve olives.

NOTE: The ideal fermenting temperature is between 64 to 78 degree F (17.7-25.5 C). If it’s cooler, the fermenting will work, but it will take longer. If the temperature is higher, the fermenting time will be shorter, but may not produce as good of quality.

To sanitize jars, just wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and set on a clean dish towel until ready to use.

The recipes are below this pictorial guide.

Fermenting Cherry Tomatoes Ingredients
Tomatoes washed & stems removed. Brine prepared in quart job. Onion chopped, basil leaves rinsed. minced garlic on spoon.

Cherry Tomato Bombs

Brine for Cherry tomatoes
Add brine to jar, then place weight (I use a 4 oz. jelly jar) on top of tomatoes.
Easy Fermenting Airlock
Fill the jar with brine. The top of the inside jar or weight needs to be 1/2″ below top of larger jar. Add filtered water to fill line on airlock.
Labels for fermenting jars
Label the jars and set in a cool, dark place to ferment. Check daily to insure everything looks good.

Fermented Cherry Tomato Bombs

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups not-quite-ripe cherry tomatoes
  • 3 or 4 fresh basil leaves
  • 1 or 2 peeled garlic cloves ( or spoonful of minced garlic)
  • 1/4 cup – 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • 3 Tablespoon sea salt (or Kosher salt)
  • Print recipe

Directions:

  • Push a toothpick all the way through the cherry tomato until it pokes through the other side, then remove the toothpick. You want two holes in each cherry tomato.
  • Layer the tomatoes, basil, onions and garlic in the jar.
  • Mix together the water and salt to make a brine, and pour over the tomatoes, making sure to cover them completely. (extra brine can be stored in the fridge)
  • Use a weight to keep the tomatoes under the brine, and add the airlock lid. (If not using an airlock, add a little more brine to the jar, cover the jar with a piece of fabric and secure it around the neck with a rubber band.)
  • Put in a cool and dark corner to ferment for 5 – 7 days. Add more brine if needed.
  • Start tasting on day 5. When the tomatoes are ready, there will be a fizzy burst in your mouth.
  • Cover with a lid and store in the fridge. The flavor will be best after 1 to 2 weeks. These will keep for about 6 months in the fridge.

Fermented Green Tomato Olives

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups green cherry tomatoes
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • 3 Tablespoon sea salt (or Kosher salt)
  • Print recipe

Directions:

  • Push a toothpick all the way through the cherry tomato until it pokes through the other side, then remove the toothpick. You want two holes in each cherry tomato.
  • Put the green cherry tomatoes in the jar.
  • Mix together the water and salt to make a brine, and pour over the tomatoes, making sure to cover them completely. (extra brine can be stored in the fridge)
  • Use a weight to keep the tomatoes under the brine, and add the airlock lid. (If not using an airlock, add a little more brine to the jar, cover the jar with a piece of fabric and secure it around the neck with a rubber band.)
  • Put in a cool and dark corner to ferment for 3 – 5 days. Add more brine if needed.
  • Start tasting on day 3. When
  • Cover with a lid and store in the fridge. The flavor will be best after 1 to 2 weeks. These will keep for about 6 months in the fridge.

 

If you aren’t use to eating fermented vegetables, I suggest you start with just a bite or two daily for a few days, until your body gets use to use to consuming fermented foods. Other wise, you might experience some stomach distress.

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Green Tomato Olives

Happy Fermenting,

Robin

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15 thoughts on “Fermenting – Cherry Tomato Bombs and Green Tomato Olives

    1. I’m so glad you found the post useful! The airlocks totally took away my fears of fermenting! They have them online, too. I just wanted 2 or 3 to start with and we were in the city, so I just picked them up there. If you haven’t seen it yet, check out my Fermented Carrots too. That was my first fermenting attempt and I love them! They’re awesome on a salad, or a sub sandwich.

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